A BLACK LADY SKETCH SHOW Season Finale: “Born at night, but not last night”

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The finale of A Black Lady Sketch Show aired this past Friday September 6th. Here are the three sketches that I enjoyed most.

Purgatory Soul Food

The first sketch let me know that we were in a special place. I really loved this sketch because it’s a commentary on our commitment to supporting black businesses. Gabrielle Dennis and Quinta Brunson hit it on the head. Talking themselves through all the shortcomings (half of the menu being unavailable, the sticky-note fail, and a walk-up counter for drinks) was spot-on. My friends and I try and support establishments for us and by us, and in the name of doing this, oftentimes compromise. I will say that these two characters lasted much longer than I would have. Waiting an hour for food, deciding to not use a quarter to get in and another quarter to get out of the bathroom, and a BYO (bring your own) silverware joint; this was too much! Shout out to Robin’s old-ass character reading about the upcoming Apocalypse. In case you haven’t realized, there are plenty of times in this series where sketches come full circle in the most subtle way.

Get The Belt ‘92 

maxresdefaultQuinta Brunson ( as Carmen Sipp) and Robin Thede (as Kimber Zak) narrate about the intense home of  Tonisha (Insecure’s Natasha Rothwell), who is known to knock challengers into next week, American Ninja Warrior style. Tonisha finds herself doing everything she can to get an attitude from her daughter Renice (Black-ish’s Marsai Martin). But the princess of the house plays by the rules, albeit ridiculous, and it results in her mom never having to “get the belt.” I was overcome with acute nostalgia in this sketch. From the cookie tin-can with odds and ends to the disorganized kitchen drawer to batteries being in the most unforeseen place, it all leads me to ask if this was shot in my child-hood home?  For many of us, we’d be charged with ridiculous tasks like getting a remote that was in hands reach. Functioning adults felt every scene I’m sure. Classic mama phrases like: “I was born at night, but not last night,” “if I have to get up and find it myself,” “worked her last good nerve,”  makes me cry out “please take this sketch into season 2.” Also, the lotion from the first scene with Yvonne Orji made an appearance in the cabinet where the batteries are. The black experience comes full circle again!

Courtroom Kiki

I wouldn’t be surprised if Tonisha was watching these ladies in action as the theme music here is the same from her TV. Here we have a Black lady courtroom. The judge was played by Yvette Nicole Brown, with Bresha Webb and Issa Rae making an appearance as well.  This sketch housed all the black girl magic one could take! From finger waves to Goddess locks, box braids, and laid wigs, every detail was noted. Rae, played Trina, the defendant, who was frustrated with this historic moment. As far as she was concerned, she had one goal: to win. Which also meant, she was not here for the in-between selfies, banter, and clear disinterest in her case. Trina girl, this was HER-story in living color! In the end, after some ridiculous evidence and banter, Trina got her win, let her hair down, and bopped to the jingle, “black lady courtroom!”

With Season 2 ordered we couldn’t be happier. Look out for a post from us celebrating the best sketches of this premiere season! Now if you haven’t, go get a dose of A Black Lady Sketch Show

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